Archive

Tag Archives: Art

West Bank barrier Banksy artwork: Little girl frisking a soldier

He’s known for his creative stencil work in the most unassuming of places, but now Bristol-born graffiti artist Banksy has embarked on a project of a different sort. And what’s that? I hear you ask. Well, he’ll be internationally premiering his debut film at the Sundance Film Festival this coming Sunday.

The movie, titled Exit Through The Gift Shop, shows him speaking on camera for the very first time and is narrated by Welsh actor Rhys Ifans (you might remember him as Spike in the film Notting Hill).

The man himself has described the film as how he “set out to film the unfilmable – and failed”. Erm, OK.

Little is known about the plot of the 89 minute feature film– that too is on the hush hush. But the festival website vaguely reveals that the film is about French filmmaker, Terry Guetta, setting out to record the “secretive world” of street art, when he subsequently meets Banksy, and so the adventure ensues.

Banky’s appeal is in his anonymity and elusiveness, so unveiling himself seems, to me, a very unlikely prospect. If anything, there’s a greater possibility that he’ll leave audiences asking more questions rather than having any pending ones answered.

Have a look at the trailer below.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

The film’s catchline is: “Life is hard. Life is short. Life is painful. Life is rich. Life is….Precious.” I thought this was quite fitting considering that the film encompasses all such adjectives and emotions. It’s a movie about the power of education, the beauty we all possess within, loving who you are, motherhood and friendship.

Based on Push– a novel written by New York poet Claireece ‘Sapphire‘ Jones- it’s set in 1980s Harlem (USA), and is about an overweight, illiterate teenager who becomes pregnant for the second time by her abusive father. She is referred on by her high school to enroll in an alternative school- for troubled teens- in the hope that her life will head in a better direction. We follow her journey of her learning to read and finding the acceptance and friendship that she deserves from her classmates and teacher. Her courage to stand up to her abusive mother (played by Mo’Nique) and move away from ‘home’ to build a new, happy life for herself and her children.

The news that Precious receives in the end is extremely sad and unfortunate. Really pulled at my hear strings, but I won’t ruin it for those of you who are yet to see it.

Directed by Lee Daniels (who also produced Monster’s Ball), it’s gritty style projects an air of delicacy yet strength and Precious’ narration, though simple gives an amazing insight into her very isolated world. 

It felt as if I was watching a documentary. That’s how real the acting translated through the screen to me. I felt totally immersed.

Gabourey Sidibe (aged 24), who plays Precious, canceled the third year of her psychology major to play the role and I thought she did a pretty damn good job of it, really embodying her observant and aware character.

I didn’t think Mariah‘s performance (as Mrs Weiss, Precious’ case worker) in this was particularly wonderful but having said that, she wasn’t awful either.

Mr Lenny Kravitz plays the role of attractive, suave Nurse John (yes a male nurse).

Precious is definitely a tale of triumph! A masterful dramatisation, some may say and no doubt a socially conscious movie.

I rate this film 8.5 pearls out of 10. A must see.

 

Precious will be released in the UK on Friday January 29th 2010. Watch the trailer below.

Enhanced by Zemanta
levi-van-veluw-seasons-appearance

Levi van Veluw's photo series of a forest on his head and shoulders

23 year old Dutch artist Levi van Veluw turns his head into works of art. His creations include turning his skull into a forrest using tree barks, pebbles, carpet, hair and yoghurt.

When asked why he uses his body rather than canvas he said it’s because it’s ‘always available’ and a ‘very direct way’ to express his ideas.

Some of his self portraits take 11 hours to complete but his work has paid off, earning him international recognition and many awards including Photographer of the Year at the IPA International Photo Awards in America.

Out of sheer serendipity whilst researching Banksy on the web, I came across English chalk artist Julian Beever, whose pavement artwork creates the illusion of three dimensions when viewed from the correct angle. His trompe- l’oeil drawings, which he has been doing since the mid-1990s, are created using a projection called anamorphosis and appear to defy the laws of perspective.